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Hallgrímskirkja, Reykjavík, Ísland

03/05/2012

The Hallgrímskirkja (Icelandic pronunciation: [ˈhatlkrimsˌcʰɪrca], church of Hallgrímur) is a Lutheran (Church of Iceland) parish church in Reykjavík, Iceland.
At 74.5 metres (244 ft), it is the largest church in Iceland and the fifth tallest architectural structure in Iceland.

State Architect Guðjón Samúelsson‘s design of the church was commissioned in 1937. He is said to have designed it to resemble the basalt lava flows of Iceland’s landscape.
It took 38 years to build the church, from 1945 to 1986.
The landmark tower was completed long before the church’s actual completion.
The church is similar in style to the expressionist architecture of Grundtvig‘s Church of Copenhagen, Denmark, completed in 1926.

The church houses a large pipe organ by the German organ builder Johannes Klais of Bonn. Its construction was finished in December 1992.

In 2008, the church underwent a major restoration of the main tower. The restoration was completed in late 2009.

Hallgrímskirkja, Lutheran (Church of Iceland) parish church in Reykjavík, Iceland_User:Someone35_http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Reykjavik's-church.jpgHallgrímskirkja, Lutheran (Church of Iceland) parish church in Reykjavík, Iceland. Photo: Someone35.

The church got its name in memory of the Icelandic clergy and poet Hallgrímur Pétursson (1614-1674), author of the Passion Hymns.

Iceland, Hallgrímskirkja, 22_http://www.travelvivi.com/the-most-unusual-churches-in-the-world/ Source

Situated in the center of Reykjavík, it is one of the city’s best-known landmarks and is visible throughout the city.

The church is also used as an observation tower. An observer can take a lift up to the viewing deck and view Reykjavík and the surrounding mountains.
Hallgrímskirkja

Reykjavik, Iceland. View from the top of Perlan showing the spire of Hallgrímskirkja._Photo Srikanth Jandhyala from San Francisco_July 2011_http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Reykjavik,_Iceland-13July2011.jpgReykjavik, Iceland. View from the top of Perlan showing the spire of Hallgrímskirkja. Photo Srikanth Jandhyala, July 2011.

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